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How Slack’s VP Aligns His Remote Teams and Encourages Cross-department Collaboration

Remote Working
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How Slack’s VP Aligns His Remote Teams and Encourages Cross-department Collaboration In 2020, working remotely is now more popular than ever. In fact, over 60% of U.S. employees between the ages of 22 and 65 say they work remotely at least occasionally — and 99% of people would choose to work remotely, at least part-time, if they could. As a fellow part-time remote employee (I typically work from home two days a week), I can understand the benefits. For instance, I find I get the most 'heads down' work done during those two days. Without the opportunity for kitchen chats, friendly debates with my desk-mates on the recent Cats movie, and hour-long team lunches, I'm incredibly productive. Of course, there are plenty of challenges that come with remote work, as well. To name a few: awkward pauses during meetings when my computer freezes, an inability to have off-the-cuff brainstorming conversations with colleagues, and the lack of random check-ins from people around the office. These challenges, while legitimate, become easier to manage with online communication tools like Zoom and Slack. Which brings me to my point: if there's anyone I'd imagine could handle remote challenges with ease, it's Brad Armstrong, the Vice President of Business and Corporate Development at Slack, one of the world's most popular workplace messaging platforms (the tool is already widely used at HubSpot, as well as major brands like IBM, Target, and Cole Haan). At Slack, Armstrong is responsible for partnerships, alliances, the Slack Fund, and...

6 Secrets to Achieving Work-Life Balance, According to HubSpot Marketing Managers

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6 Secrets to Achieving Work-Life Balance, According to HubSpot Marketing Managers Have you ever heard the phrase, "If you love your job, you'll never have to work again."? Well, that myth is both false and incredibly misleading. In fact, research shows that the more passionate you are about a job, the more work you'll actually do. The truth is, a successful career takes time, initiative, and hours of hard work. And, while some companies enable employees to successfully execute on their roles within 40 hours each week, you'll occasionally need to work later or longer to excel at other organizations When you think you have the perfect job, you might tell yourself, "I clock in 70 hours a week because I'm doing what I love," or "The family dinners I'm missing will be worth it in the long run." But, while your role might not "feel" like a job, working long hours without making time for yourself eventually takes a major toll. In fact, research shows that throwing yourself into work too heavily could cause stress, burnout, and -- commonly -- a lonely personal life. Yes -- Managers value employees who take initiative and put in extra effort when needed. However, your personal life is important to your physical, psychological, and emotional well-being. So, how do you continue to excel in your career while making time for yourself and your loved ones? The truth is, there's no simple trick to achieving an ideal work-life balance. But, luckily, there...

Remote Smarketing 101: How to Align Distributed Marketing and Sales Teams

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Remote Smarketing 101: How to Align Distributed Marketing and Sales Teams To create the optimal customer experience, it's undeniably critical your sales and marketing teams are well-aligned. If you don't, your prospects will suffer. For instance, imagine this: your prospect has been researching a new video conferencing tool for weeks. She's finally found one company she's extremely interested in — yours. Before calling a sales rep, your prospect decides to read numerous blog posts on your website. She also downloads an ebook, watches your company's YouTube videos, and even chats in a few of your community forums. Once your marketing materials have convinced her your product could be a good fit, she decides to call one of your company's sales rep. Unfortunately, the sales rep has no background knowledge on the content with which the prospect has already interacted. The sales rep begins a generic introductory sales pitch, not realizing your prospect is almost ready to buy — she just has a few final questions. This results in a less-than-ideal user experience for your prospect, who won't feel valued as someone who's been interacting with your brand's content for weeks already. Additionally, it isn't an ideal experience for your company's sales or marketing teams, either. If the sales rep was aware of the content with which the prospect has interacted, they'd have an easier time connecting with the prospect and understanding her needs upfront. Ultimately, well-aligned sales and marketing teams have a major impact on your business' bottom...