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What is Brand Salience? [+How Do You Measure It?]

Branding
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What is Brand Salience? While branding can feel like a vague concept, it's one of the most important elements of a marketing strategy. Did you know that presenting a brand consistently across all platforms can increase revenue by up to 23%? Plus, consistently presented brands are 3.5 times more likely to have excellent brand visibility than those with inconsistent branding. In fact, 82% of investors say name recognition is an important factor guiding them in their investment decisions. So, what does all this mean? Well, consistent branding leads to increased brand awareness which can then help gain investors and drive revenue to your business. Needless to say, branding is important for your business to succeed. In this post, let's review what brand salience is, how you can increase your brand visibility, and how to measure it. If you have high brand salience, then you have a strong brand presence that consumers recognize and think about when they need a product. If you have low brand salience, then consumers might not know your brand exists and therefore won't think of your brand when they need to make a purchase. Essentially, brand salience is a similar metric as brand awareness except it's focused on measuring awareness during the actual purchasing decision instead of overall brand visibility. For example, when someone wants to get a cup of coffee and is driving around, what's the first brand they think of? Probably Starbucks. When they want to buy tissues, they think of Kleenex....

The Beginner’s Guide to Brand Pillars

Branding
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The Beginner's Guide to Brand Pillars Although the practices of marketing and branding have been around for centuries, the industries started to shift in the 1990s. The digital age came about and companies began to market their brands more than their products with the goal of giving their company a personality. As a millennial born in the early 90s, I grew up at the same time as the digital revolution. In fact, millennials have a reputation for spending all day on their phones and being lazy. However, I'd argue that as the digital age and technology began to evolve, so did society's work expectations. Businesses, and even employees, are expected to be a brand in and of themselves that has value and positively impacts society (instead of just selling products). As a marketer or business owner, you might be wondering, "How can I create a brand that my audience connects with?" In this post, we'll discuss how to create brand pillars that clearly communicate your brand identity to your audience. For example, brand pillars can be core values, important strengths, or aspects of a brand that support or add dimension to the core idea of "Who are you?" Essentially, these brand pillars can be anything that your customers find important -- perhaps it's innovation, reliability, on-time delivery, etc. Brand pillars are meant to differentiate your brand and should be valued and endorsed by your customers. When someone asks why your customers like your brand, they'll probably be able to...

3 Ways to Leverage Brand Champions for Your Business

Branding
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3 Ways to Leverage Brand Champions for Your Business In our personal lives, we all want people who champion us. If we're lucky, that will start with our family and extend to our friends and significant others. In an ideal work environment, our managers will also champion us and help us climb the ladder. There's nothing better than having people cheering for you on the sidelines and advocating for you in the rooms you're not in. As a business owner, you also want that level of support for your brand. That's where a brand champion comes in as someone who promotes your business and helps grow your loyalty base. Let's dive into why you need a brand champion, how to get one, and how to incorporate it into your marketing strategy. Depending on the size of your business, you may have one or several champions. Sometimes, that role is embedded in your staff's responsibilities. For instance, an employer brand specialist is responsible for promoting a company's culture and benefits to outside candidates. That, in itself, is a type of brand champion, as their role is centered around campaigning for your brand. You can say the same for brand ambassadors who partner with businesses to promote them and generate leads. A key difference to note here is that there is typically a contractual obligation for ambassadors to promote your brand. Champions may be incentivized to do so, but they're not required to celebrate your brand. In a small company,...

5 Ways to Build a Positive Brand Association [+ Examples]

Branding
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5 Ways to Build a Positive Brand Association Whoever said "All publicity is good publicity" lied. The only truth in it is that bad publicity can bring attention to your brand and expand your reach. However, first impressions (and every impression) after that can last. So, if your brand is associated with negative traits and concepts, it can be difficult to change that perception. Learn what makes up a brand association and how to build a positive one. Several factors influence brand association, including: Brand identity and messaging Brand assets, such as logo and colors Customer experience Product and service quality Word of mouth Reputation Advertisements Social media presence You’ll notice that most of these factors are controlled by the brand itself, which is good news. This means that brands play a key role in how consumers perceive them. It also signifies that if the association with your brand isn’t particularly positive, you have the potential to change it. Brand Association Examples Here are a few common brand association examples. Charmin - Bears, soft, toilet paper Google – Search, answers, information Wikipedia – Information, biography Anima Iris – Luxury, black excellence Canva – Graphic design, easy, templates Rhum Barbancourt – Quality, Haïti, classic As you can see, most of the associations are a mix of services or products the company may provide along with certain traits and concepts. The hope is that the associations made with your...

Reputation Management: How to Protect Your Brand Online in 2021

Branding
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Reputation Management: How to Protect Your Brand Online in 2021 A positive brand image can undoubtedly influence a consumer's decision to buy a product — and, for virtually every business, building a positive brand image starts online. Nowadays, your reputation is largely dependent on social media and online review sites. For instance, consumers need to read an average of 10 online reviews before they feel they can trust a local business. Since brand image makes such an impression on someone's decision to purchase, you must regularly monitor your reputation online. Still, it can feel like a daunting task, particularly when so much of it is out of your control. Fortunately, there are plenty of tools and strategies you can implement to ensure you're protecting your brand in 2021. In this post, we’ll give a clear overview of brand reputation management, how to create a plan to manage your business reputation, and high-quality tools to supplement your process. Reputation management is a continuous process, as it allows you to stay on top of your brand’s public perception and address possible damaging situations as soon as they occur. When your reputation is positive, you inspire customer loyalty, a significant driver of revenue and growth. A negative reputation can be damaging to sales and customer retention, but it also helps you learn about what customers like, which can be helpful for updating business processes to better meet consumer needs. Brand safety has recently become discussed in conversation with reputation management,...

16 Benefits of Branding & Co-Branding

Branding
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16 Benefits of Branding & Co-Branding In more ways than one, branding is a pillar of success. It helps you develop a set of features unique to your business, like a logo and brand name, which allows customers to come to know your brand and associate it with what you have to offer. Branding is impactful in and of itself, but co-branding brings additional opportunities and benefits to businesses that engage in it. In this post, discover the advantages that come from generating brand individuality for your business, and the added benefits that come from co-branding with a partner. 1. Branding is often the deciding factor for consumers making purchasing decisions. Branding is often the deciding factor for consumers when making a purchase decision. In fact, consumers report being more likely to buy from brands that they know or know and already have a positive experience with. This is especially true for social media, as 89% of consumers say they’ll buy from a brand they already follow and recognize over a competitor. Given this, having a recognizable and unique brand gives you a leg up with customers, as they would feel safer buying from a business they already know. 2. Branding gives your business an identity. Branding gives your business an identity beyond just the products and services you sell. You become more than just a name, especially if you develop a brand mission separate from your products. For example, if your brand is committed to social responsibility, you’ll become associated with those...

3 Easy Steps to Build Your Brand Promise [+10 examples]

Branding
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3 Easy Steps to Build Your Brand Promise If you're a decent human being, you always honor a pinky promise. For the uninitiated, a pinky promise is usually between two people and it holds more weight than a spit shake, legal contract, verbal agreement, and "I swear on my " statements combined. It's part of our social contract – once it's been agreed upon, it cannot be broken. A brand promise is the scaled, commercial version of the pinky promise, with the brand holding up one finger and its target audience holding up the other. Except, in this case, breaking it won't just ruin your reputation, it can impact your revenue. Let's talk about how to create a brand promise and see examples from popular brands. What is a brand promise? A brand promise reveals what consumers can expect from a brand across all touchpoints. It serves as a company's foundational value and informs every aspect of the company, from its messaging to its customer service. Your brand promise should be central to your company, something that remains constant as it grows and evolves. Not every brand promise is explicit. In many cases, it's more of an internal mantra that's shared with employees, investors, and partners. However, when you have built a strong brand identity and clear messaging, your brand promise can be assumed by your target audience. There's often some confusion between a brand promise and a tagline, so let's break it down. While it can...

5 Lessons We Learned from These Famous Rebrands

Branding
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5 Lessons We Learned from These Famous Rebrands It can be difficult (if not impossible) to create a brand that remains fresh, relevant, and inspiring years — or even decades — post-creation. Just consider Dunkin' Donuts: the brand, first established in 1973, recently shifted its focus to coffee — and, to demonstrate the shift, dropped the 'Donuts' in the name. The rebrand makes sense. Dunkin's consumers' preferences, tastes, and style have likely changed quite a bit in the roughly 50 years since the first Dunkin' was introduced. Dunkin' needed a rebrand to ensure its business could grow with its consumers, or risk falling behind. A rebrand can successfully re-establish your brand in an industry, help expand your product offerings, or attract new consumers. But it's not as simple as copying-and-pasting a fresh logo onto your homepage. A good rebrand demands redefining your company's vision and values, re-establishing your brand's audience, and rebuilding your brand identity from the ground up. Fortunately, if your business is considering a rebrand, you're in luck. Here, we've compiled five successful examples of rebrands to help inspire your own efforts. Use these examples to kickstart your own rebrand in 2021. Five Successful Examples of Rebrands 1. Petco In October 2020, Petco released an announcement declaring it would no longer sell electronic "shock" collars. The announcement was used to highlight the company's rebranding efforts — the pet store, which is over 50 years old, was officially rebranding itself as a health and wellness company for pets. The pet...

How to Create a Writing Style Guide Built for the Web [Free Guide]

Branding
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How to Create a Writing Style Guide Built for the Web Businesses pump out content at a staggering rate these days — and as that volume increases, more inconsistencies are bound to creep in. Whether due to lack of clarity about the style in which you'd like to write or disjointed communication across the multitude of content creators in your organization, failure to decide upon and document accepted editorial guidelines is a recipe for inconsistent messaging. That's why at some point, most companies accept that they'll need to develop a writing style guide. In short: a document that indicates the basic rules of writing we'll all agree to follow to ensure consistency across all our content — like whether I should've capitalized the "a" after the colon in this sentence. Answer: If you write content for HubSpot, you should not capitalize the "a." But wait... if that's the case, why would I capitalize the "If" in that last parenthetical? Because "If you write content for HubSpot, you should..." is a complete sentence, thus warranting the capital "If." These conventions are specified in our writing style guide. If you found that train of thought terribly banal, you might think writing style guides are the most boring things in the world and have a burning desire to click away right about now. Au contraire, mon frère. Why Writing Guides Are Important The existence of a writing style guide is what saves you from finding yourself embroiled in a debate...

The Ultimate Guide to Branding in 2021

Branding
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The Ultimate Guide to Branding in 2021 Products are never just products, right? Coca-Cola is more than a soda. Starbucks is more than a coffee. Ray-Ban is more than a pair of sunglasses. Glossier is more than a tube of concealer. Interacting with these products provide experiences, and we buy them with that experience in mind. Better yet, the companies that create and market them know exactly the experience they want you to have when you make (or consider) a purchase. That’s why they create a brand. From the language in their Instagram caption to the color palette on their latest billboard to the material used in their packaging, companies who create strong brands know that their brand needs to live everywhere. They know their names extend far beyond the label. The result? These brands are known, loved, and chosen out of a long lineup of options. Who doesn’t want that? I know I do. That’s why we built this guide — to equip you to create and manage a strong brand that’ll help your business be admired, remembered, and preferred. Use the links below to jump ahead to sections of interest, and don’t forget to bookmark this guide for later. What’s a brand? Before I dive into the importance of branding and how to build a brand, let’s go back to basics: What is a brand? A brand is a feature or set of features that distinguish one organization from another. A brand is typically...